Dystopie 2.0 bis

Dans la série « amusons-nous avec les nouveaux croque-mitaines du web », une petite réflexion de Nicholas Carr, observateur critique du mouvement web 2.0, qui entrevoit dans le développement de services communautaires type Flickr une certaine forme d'élitisme (paradoxal dirons certains) : le partage et la générosité ne sont pas donnés à tout le monde.

We're seeing what looks like the erosion of the American middle class and the rise of a new aristocracy, as a very thin slice of the population reaps an ever larger share of the bounties of Information Age capitalism. Generosity sounds lovely as an economic principle, and I suppose it can be lovely in reality, too - so long as you're one of the chosen few who can afford to exchange precious gifts.

Carr Nicholas, « Generous to a fault ».

Mise à jour (06/04/2006) : la réflexion de Nicholas Carr se poursuit en signalant un texte fort pertinent qui aborde des questions que Karl Dubost avait déjà mis en lumière :

Before I continue, lest I be labeled disingenuous, I should make clear that I am NOT railing against all this. I use Flickr every day - more like 300 times a day; it's my #1 destination, almost as often as my email inbox - and I manage weblogs that sport Google Ads and Technorati tag.and del.ico.us links and all that stuff. I just want to try to make sure people actually realize what is going on.

We are all working for them. For free. That's how it's "about we". It's not a "media revolution", it's a reversion to feudal medievalism. "Voluntary servitude" it's been called (back in 1548!) (This is worth a read too though it has quite a Marxist taste to it. ;p

Anthony B., « It's not about you », Bopuc, 28 mars 2006.

Références :

Titre
It's not about you
Auteurs
  • B. ANTHONY
Editeur
Bopuc
Date
Titre
Generous to a fault
Auteurs
  • Nicholas CARR
Editeur
Rough Type
Date